Black Friday: Is it Worth it?

So, with just over a month left until Christmas; the rush to finish shopping is well and truly on. While I’m sure there are many of you out there who have already finished your shopping and have nothing at all left to buy, I am also certain that there are loads of you (like me) who have ALL of your shopping to do. As I am a part of this group Im going to let you in to a few secrets for coping with the ultimate shopping day of the year, BLACK FRIDAY.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the Black Friday shopping day, although with it being plastered all over our screens from the 1st of November it would be hard not to have at least heard of it before. Black Friday, which originated in America is the last Friday in November/the Friday after thanksgiving. While in America stories of Black Friday bring stories of long queues outside shops, violent fights which can only envy Monica, Phoebe and Rachel wedding dress shopping; it can be a dangerous game venturing out to the shops that day; although I’m yet to experience hair pulling and name calling in Victoria Square. 

How prepared I think I am for the Black Friday Sales

Shopping on Black Friday when every shop within your eyesight has a big, shiny, sale sign outside can be daunting. Who’s doing the best deal? Who’s got a sale on all stock? Who’s only using it as an excuse to get rid of last seasons stock? The best way to go about this is to do your research. Generally if a brand has American roots, or has a presence in America you can count on some sort of sale, should it only be minor. One rule which I have learned is generally true when it comes to Black Friday is that ‘The bigger the brand the bigger the sale’ we’re talking Hollister, Pull and Bear, Guess, Black Friday deals are huge in these shops and are usually on the autumn/winter stock; in other words, stuff you would actually want to buy at this time of year.

But while the physical sales are rivalled only by Boxing Day sales, there is a lot to be said for the online Black Friday sales. Come 12.01am on 29th November there will be price cuts left, right and centre. Even the staff in some shops will recommend waiting until their online black Friday prices come out as the savings are so good – music to all parents ears!

How prepared I actually am

But what is our infatuation with Black Friday and why do we feel like we save more on this sale, on the last Friday in November than we do in any other sale of the year? Well, really the price cuts in some stores aren’t that great and some shops don’t even take part. Primarily the best deals can be found in American brand stores and the UK based brands might have a 20% sale; quite mediocre if you are managing to save 50% in say Hollister. Black Friday has become so much of an institution now many brands start their offers early; Amazon have started advertising their Black Friday deals already. 

Has Black Friday turned in to a marketing ploy from shops to make us think that were making huge savings on our Christmas shopping? Most shops have deals on and off for the whole Christmas shopping period, so the savings we make in November could easily be recreated in December, but we have ourselves convinced that doing as much Christmas shopping on the last Friday in November is absolutely pivotal to keeping our costs down in terms of Christmas presents. So is it time to wind down Black Friday in the UK or continue to embrace the biggest shopping day of the year given to us from across the pond? I for one will continue to embrace it because after all, who doesn’t love a good sale?

Niamh Magee is a second year BSc in Communication Management and Public Relations student at Ulster University. She can be found at Twitter: niamhmagee_ and Instagram: neevmagee

How ITV’s Love Island led ‘I Saw It First’ to become an e-commerce success

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As cliché as it sounds, watching Love Island is everyone’s guilty pleasure. It was only in the series past that I decided to give in and watch the show and I could now understand why my friends were all so engrossed and didn’t want our evening plans to surpass 9pm. For 8 weeks it was the hottest discussions in social outings, work, the gym and even my mummy tried keeping up to date with the latest goss about the islanders so she could be in the know. Whilst watching these rising celebrities to be and their relationship drama unfold did you ever wonder how and where they got the look? Last year, it was reported that the shows fashion sponsor Missguided achieved an increase in sales of 40% when the show aired. Was it possible for I Saw It First to match or exceed this achievement as they signed an exclusive partnership for series 5 of the show?

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I Saw It First, who were relatively unknown before sponsoring ITV’s Love Island are a fast-fashion brand who provide for the glamorous, fashion obsessed female. Keeping up with the latest trends they never fail to end the ‘I’ve got nothing to wear!’ dilemma and all at an affordable price. Only having been on the market since 2017, I Saw It First have been on one hell of a journey. From obtaining an innovative sponsorship with the lavish Ocean Beach Ibiza to collaborations with Cindy Kimberly, Lolo Wood and Stassie (yeah, just google them) they have managed to put themselves on the fashion map.

The majority of Love Island viewers come from millennials and Gen Z; two of the biggest generations who are the true digital natives. It comes with no shock that social media was going to manifest the experience of the show as viewer’s more than likely sit with their smartphone in hand refreshing Twitter for the latest on what others had to say, like really do we ever put them down anyway? The clothing company used this as part of their strategy to help with the increase of sales. Before the show, islanders were given a nice little allowance to choose any clothes from the summer collection to wear on-screen. Not only did this create a closer relationship between the brand and islanders, perhaps allowing for them to work together in the long run but it also provided organic content to be uploaded rather than the traditional sponsored posts, conveying good old brand personality.

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Wanting to avoid anything Love Island related? Then it was best to avoid Twitter itself if you could. Swamped with memes, spoilers and outfit highlights it was the number one app to keep updated on the goss from the villa. When the first episode of series 5 aired, reports show there were over 400,000 tweets mentioning Love Island. This was I Saw It First’s time to shine as they cleverly included the Love Island hashtag in their tweets to take advantage of the incredible reach. I mean, why wouldn’t you?

The e-tailer also created a hashtag on Twitter; #ISawIsland so users could easily search for those savvy neon dresses and funky bikinis, providing a link straight to the item so it could be purchased there and then. In addition to this, they created a Love Island hub on their website with profiles of each female islander and individual story highlights of each female on Instagram with a swipe-up link so you didn’t have to go through endless pages of clothes, very convenient. They also integrated their product placement onto the show’s click-to-buy app. When using the app to vote, users were surrounded with advertisements that provided a direct link to any of the items featured, giving viewers an easy way to find and shop the outfits seen on screen whilst allowing them to build an association of the two brands. Talk about dedication! Or just really wanting to up those sales.

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I Saw It First really do have their finger on the pulse of the fashion industry. Landing this opportunity with a show that has 6 million viewers tells us that the traditional methods of marketing makes for powerful advertising formula, using reality TV as a vehicle for influencer marketing. As a result of collaborating with the show it led them to an increase of 67% in sales month on month. They continue to be consistent with their methods throughout all their social channels and ensure their content is fresh and engaging, having gained 905k followers which comes with a fantastic opportunity to access their target market even more. The partnership focuses on an audience that have the talent of scrolling miles on their phone and watching the show at the same time.

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With social commerce on the rise, rather than consumers making direct purchases through retailer websites, they’re discovering products on social platforms and perusing their purchases there, a drive to be the new online marketplace. I Saw It First’s Love Island hub, their Instagram profile and the Love Island app provide endless opportunities to do so, a marketing masterpiece.

Fionnuala Hegarty is a final year BSc in Communication Management & Public Relations student at Ulster University. She can be found on: Twitter – @fionnualaheg,  LinkedIn – Fionnuala Hegarty, and Instagram – fionnualahegarty

 

Placement Panic

In this exact moment in time I wish I could just press pause in my life so all the stresses and worries of second year could disappear into thin air and just bugger off for an appreciated 5 minutes (that’s all I’m asking for).

It pains me to say that I am guilty of entering second year with the delusional mindset that it’s not going to be that much harder than 1st year, however, spoiler alert, it actually is a LOT harder.

I know there will be other people in my class who will read this and laugh at me because they may think so far second year is a breeze. They obviously haven’t felt the same weight on their shoulders as I have and if that is the case honestly fair play because I’d love to be in your position. However, surprise – I am not! Because here I am, writing this blog about how incredibly stressed out I am and it’s only the start of November.

The main cause of my current condition of basically just being a big bag of nerves is due to the dreaded topic of placement. At present, the only thing that seems to be going through my sore little head are the words ‘placement’ and ‘CV’. I’m sure many people have been in a similar position, because no one wants to consider that there will be a time (very soon) when they’ll not be kicking around the Jordanstown mall with their mates or making their way down to the Hatfield on a casual Tuesday night, for the weekly ‘County Holylands’. Instead, they’ll be making their overnight oats, laying out their clothes for their 9-5 in the office and anticipating the dreaded alarm blaring beside them at 7am the next morning. I know I know; I honestly can’t bare to think about it myself, I’ll start tearing up.

However folks, this is the sad reality of the dreaded placement life the majority of us will unfortunately all face at some stage in our university lives. So I’m writing this blog because I want my fellow stressed students to know I feel your pain, like a slap in the face, I feel it. It’s daunting, nerve-wracking and just down right scary that we have to step foot into the adult way of life and start putting together a 2 page document that defines exactly who we are, what we can do and what we’re good at.  Realistically, it would take a lot more for the people reading them to see how pretty amazing we all really are.

Personally, I’m not even exactly sure what it is I want to do yet, or what route of my course I want wander down because there’s so many different opportunities. I’m anxious about every possible aspect of placement, including what tasks I’ll be trusted with, what clothes I’ll wear everyday (so I look suitable for the role), if I’ll find myself in the same place or perhaps across waters in new surroundings (which in itself, comes with a whole lot more responsibilities my brain can’t even bare to consider right now) and if the people I’ll be working alongside will even like me…and not kick me out.

So I’ll end on a slightly higher note than I started. If anyone stumbles across this word vomit I have splattered out onto this page, and even slightly relates to how I’m feeling then please let me know! It’s a lot easier to suffer when you’re suffering alongside someone else who’s in the same boat, someone who reassures and comforts you because THEY GET YOU. As the saying goes, “if you don’t laugh, you’ll cry”, so let’s all try have a laugh, even if we’re all just laughing at ourselves.

Holly Gillan is a second year BSc in Communication, Advertising and Marketing BSc student at Ulster University. She can be found at: Facebook: Holly Gillan, Twitter: @Hollyg453, Instagram: hollygillan987 and LinkedIn: Holly Gillan

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas…

I am the last person you will find saying anything negative about Christmas, but this there is something that annoys me every year.

Does Christmas seem to come earlier each year? Like seriously, we haven’t even celebrated Halloween and the majority of supermarkets have their Christmas isles stocked with this year’s festive food and decorations. I am by no means a scrooge; I’m quite the opposite, but please, not in September.

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I am someone who cannot get enough of the festive season, but each year I wonder what the need is for stores to start bombarding us with Christmas so early.

Christmas can be an expensive time of year, after buying gifts, food, alcohol and having maybe one too many Christmas nights out, the pennies do add up. The Bank of England suggest that the typical UK household spends over £500 more in December compared to other months. So I get why people that have to buy a lot of gifts like to be well prepared and spread the costs over a couple of months, but does seeing Christmas and Halloween displays at the same time not really irritate you?

It wasn’t until I googled ‘why do shops start displaying Christmas so early’ that I came across the term Christmas Creep. Christmas creep is more commonly used in the US to describe the way retailers introduce Christmas ads, promotions and merchandise way ahead of the traditional start of the festive shopping season. For some shoppers it works, they like to be organised and have all their gifts bought before the clocks even go back but others (like me) get irritated when we see things being displayed before Halloween. Why? Because I honestly do not see the need, it’s not like we are going to forget and I doubt stores will run out of anything two months in advance.

Getting stock on the shelves early plays a large part in companies’ strategic marketing plans. Competition is high and a lot of stores make the majority of their money for the year during the festive period so I suppose it only makes sense to try and extend that success earlier into the year when it comes to present buying but does it make sense to display festive food months in advance that expire in October? Yes Asda, I am talking about you.

I came across this tweet in September

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Asda advertising their Mince pies with the packaging reading ‘juicy raisins, festive spices and crumbly pasty…because it’s not Christmas without them’ and apparently not September without Mince Pies either, right Asda?

Maybe I am just one of the shoppers that like to leave everything to the festive season. I love seeing the Christmas lights, love buying presents and the general buzz around Christmas time. As stressful as it is, there is something oh so satisfying about rushing about supermarkets on Christmas Eve to make sure that you have everything you need for a great Christmas. So personally, getting sorted as early as October seems like it would take away from the Christmas experience. My biggest fear would be that all the things we love about Christmas will lose their novelty. Before we know it, all the festive food we love, like pigs in blankets, mince pies, selection boxes and all the rest of it will just become a normal thing for families to have year round, but it’s the small things like this that really make Christmas what it is.

I guess my point is can we just let Halloween have its moment and enjoy the festive season any time from the 1st of November.

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Rant over.

Jenna Sloan is a final year Bsc in Communication Management and Public Relations student at Ulster University. She can be found at: Twitter – jennaaaaa_ and LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/jenna-sloan-17152417b

A Students Guide to Surviving the Drive to Uni

While we are all very well aware of the rule of the roads, after all we don’t get a license now unless we pass a test on it. But knowing the legal rules of the road and practising them can be two different things, especially if you’re trying to get up the M2 between the unforgiving driving hours of 7 and 9am, Monday to Friday.

With week 2 now being over, and the huge influx of people who will now be on the roads in the ‘rush hour’ traffic in the mornings, I have come up with a help list to make things that little bit easier for those who are driving this year.

DO

Please, and I cannot stress this enough USE YOUR INDICATORS! Sitting in bumper to bumper traffic for miles on end, maybe not being at your most alert of the day and having a nippy Corsa swerve its away in to the tiniest of gaps, narrowly missing a front bumper all to gain a whole 0.002 seconds of their arrival time grinds my gears (excuse the pun). So please, if you see a gap come up stick your indicator on, wait a second to see if the gap widens and then proceed to move in to the gap. Its really simple if you think about it.

DON’T

Don’t, for the love of all that is holy on this earth, sit at the sound defying speed of 60mph on the M2. 70mph is the speed limit for the motorway and for the most part this is the general speed of all of the cars around you. Driving at a considerably lower speed to the surrounding cars as well as dealing with the large number of cars on the road, can be very infuriating. You may be in plenty of time for your class, but that does not mean to say it’s okay to hold up a whole road for the

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Show some acknowledgement to your fellow drivers, a wee smile here, a wave there, a flash of the hazard lights- it’s the little things. Let the driver behind know that your appreciative that they are holding back the drivers behind them to let your F Type Jag in in front of you. Us fellow drivers aren’t asking for a lot, we don’t want to you send us a thank you note we just want some love for our hassles.

DON’T

Use your horn accordingly. Don’t be blaring the horn for the sake of it, or because someone couldn’t get changed lanes, after all there is an unbelievable amount of cars on the roads between 7am and 9am and getting changed lanes quickly is not the easiest of feats. So please don’t alarm other drivers. Its early, we’re all in the same boat, none of us realistically want to be awake at that time of the morning so please, stay chill.

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Plan ahead. This I can’t make this any clearer! It will be your saving grace and will take an enormous amount of pressure off you for your first drive. The M2 is unforgiving, it’s a free for all and as my mummy would say many drivers you would think got their licenses out of Barrys. So do yourself, and all of us a favour and plan your journey. Google it, stick it on your phone, do whatever you need to do to keep yourself right. Make sure you know where you’re going, how long its going to take you and know what lane you need to be in and when you need to change. Those who don’t know where they are going stand out like sore thumbs in the mornings- the changing lanes frequently, the slowing down coming to slip ways, drivers know the signs.

DON’T

The final point in my survival guide to the M2, is by far the most important. If you want to avoid being honked at, lights flashed at you and really avoid any other forms of drivers trying to grab your attention. MOVE OUT OF THE WAY. Yes it is very daunting seeing the road move in to 6 lanes, signs everywhere and really it looking like the opening scene to Disney Pixars Cars- but move out of the way. Other drivers know where they are going and the frustration of someone sitting in a lane in front of them tootling along can be the most irritating thing on the planet. To be totally honest, it’s for your own good.

Niamh Magee is a second year BSc in Communication Management and Public Relations student at Ulster University. She can be found at Twitter: niamhmagee_ and Instagram: neevmagee

Following in Dad’s footsteps – how did I end up here?

From the ages of 12 to 16, if you’d asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up, the answer certainly would’ve changed depending on my mood. Whether it was a barrister, a pathologist, or a translator, I pretty much wanted to be everything under the sun at one point or another. But one thing that stayed consistent was that I had absolutely no interest in following in my parents’ footsteps and becoming a civil servant or going in to marketing.

I just always had the mentality that following in your parents’ footsteps would somehow take away from your own individuality – something that was very important to me. So, how is it then that 5 years later I’m embarking on the final year of my CAM degree and currently working as a marketing assistant?

Again, it wasn’t just that I woke up one day and decided to copy my dad and go on to study marketing, it was a very unconventional and at times very difficult path that brought me to where I am today. I’ll begin with September 2014, aged 16 and just starting lower sixth studying French, Irish, Maths and History, not anywhere close to the subjects you would expect a future CAM student to study, right? Well as I said I couldn’t decide on a specific career path before picking A Levels so with the idea that a lot of degree courses don’t expect specific subjects, I decided the safest option would be to go for the ones I enjoyed most.

But, week one of lower sixth comes to an end and my whole life changed. On Friday 5th September 2014, my dad suffered a massive stroke that initially left him with a 30% chance of survival, complete right side paralysis and global aphasia*. We were told that our whole lives would have to change and that my dad would be left in a wheelchair for the rest of his life, never speak again and would need 24/7 care. Being the optimists that we are, we took this with a pinch of salt and kept focusing on him making a full recovery (side note – five years on he is walking, driving and even has limited speech). We did however, know that this was going to take a lot of time, effort and money from the whole family. With my mum and sister both working full time, I even considered  leaving school to care for him but after lots of discussions, I realised that as an educator, my dad would never have accepted this. We decided we had to keep everything as normal as possible because after all, our lives had changed enough – I was going to stay in school, my mum and sister were going to stay in work and we were all going to take on the responsibility of caring for my dad and taking turns with the everyday responsibilities such as cooking, cleaning, shopping etc.

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This was of course very difficult and I could write an entire book on that story alone but alas we are talking about my path to marketing. During the mid-term break over Halloween, all lower sixth students had to embark on a week’s work experience, not having time to apply for work experience myself because my dad was still in hospital gravely ill, I reached out to two of my dad’s friends who worked in PR and Graphic Design to ask if they could take me on for a couple of days. They were of course willing to do anything possible to help and so began my journey into this industry.

I spent the first three days of the week shadowing Joanne McNeill at her PR agency, McNeill Communications – at this point I had zero idea what PR actually meant, apart from knowing that some of my friends did PR for Thompsons and Filthys. I did know that it was along the same lines as marketing and had therefore decided that although this experience wouldn’t help me in my career, it would be nice to get a few days away from school and the hospital. Within the first few hours of shadowing Joanne, my mind had been completely changed. We had been working on launch events and planning for a Red Bull event and it all seemed like the most interesting work in the world – I hadn’t enjoyed myself so much in a long time. The last two days of the week were spent with Mark Mulholland at Whitenoise Designs and although we both knew for certain that I was never going to me a graphic designer, he brought me to an event set up and showed the ins and outs of all the technical and branding elements. This was an amazing experience and set in stone my love for corporate events.

I’ll skip on a year to the start of upper sixth when we were about to attend the open days at Queen’s and Ulster and we had to do some research on the degrees they offered so that we could make the most of our time and attend specific talks. At this point, I still had some interest in keeping on my language studies and I was STILL set against studying straight marketing because I did not want to end up on the same career path as my dad, after all it was PR I’d fallen in love with at this stage. I hadn’t heard of anyone doing a degree in PR and didn’t really think such a thing existed so I was leaning towards French and International Business at Queen’s. Then, as I was browsing through the Ulster open day schedule, I noticed the CMPR and CAM talks and was instantly intrigued.

I went on to apply for both courses and sit my A Levels and months later after painstakenly waiting for remarks to meet the CAM grade boundaries, I was officially a CAM student.

Now three years on I’ve just completed a twelve month Corporate Communications internship in London at The Walt Disney Company and I’m currently working as a Marketing Assistant at Mirror Media. Needless to say, my 17 year old self was naive to the similarities between PR and marketing and when I decided to go into PR I firmly believed I was not following in my dad’s footsteps. But, alas, here I am, unintentionally following my dad’s discipline that I’d always been so against and I have to say that I couldn’t be happier. The past five years have of course taught me a lot but I’ve mainly learned that the bad things that happen to us are only going to teach us lessons that no book will and sometimes they’ll even lead you down the best path. I’ve learned that it’s important not to stress too much about your career path and as cliché as it sounds, everything will work itself out in the end.  

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*Global Aphasia – This is the most severe form of aphasia, a language impairment, and is applied to patients who can produce few recognizable words and understand little or no spoken language. Persons with Global Aphasia can neither read nor write.

Emily Spackman McKee is a final year BSc in Communication, Advertising & Marketing student at Ulster University. She can be found on: Twitter @_spackman and LinkedIn Emily Spackman McKee 

10 Tips for Surviving Jaw Surgery

A few weeks ago, I wrote a lengthy post about my experience with orthognathic surgery, which you can read here. In this post, I have decided to write about my top 10 tips for getting through the recovery stage. First and foremost, if you reached the recovery stage, it means the worst is over and while you may be in pain at the minute each day really does get a little easier!

1.Do your research

I cannot stress this point enough. While there isn’t a lot of first-hand anecdotal content online regarding UK and Irish jaw surgery experiences, the stuff that you can find is really helpful. Taking a day or two to get yourself together, make a list for purchasing your supplies and even reaching out to people who have been through it will make things all the better. Especially for your carers as they may find it hard to understand your voice when your jaw is locked together!

2. Get your supplies

Following on from my point above, you will have a very long list of things you will want to buy or borrow before you go in for the operation. A few of the essentials include extra pillows, a set of baby toothbrushes, medical toothpaste and mouthwash, a few sets of comfy pyjamas (Primark’s finest!), books, magazines, Vaseline, a Netflix subscription and the list goes on. Making sure you have sufficient towels, ice packs and hot cloths is imperative. Towels are perfect for the drooling and eating. Mixing up ice packs and hot cloths will also help to bring down the swelling (and subsequently, the pain). It’s well known that it’s individual preference for heat or ice, so just see what works best for you. Or if you’re like me, keep switching it up.

3. Have the right medicine

Supplies are one thing but medication is essential. Obviously, your doctor and dentist’s advice paramount, but any recommendations help! Your doctor will tell you to get liquid paracetamol and ibuprofen because you won’t be able to fit the tablets in your mouth. They will be your saviour. I also had problems with earaches and the best thing for this for me was antihistamines! They really brought down the aches and helped me to sleep, but beware they make you really drowsy with the condition you’re already in.

Vicks is also a fail-safe recommended by mummies and grannies across Ireland! Drop some in boiling water, put a towel over your head and inhale. This will help clear your blocked nose and sinuses.  

4. Get to Tesco

Choosing between what liquids you think you can eat is a LOT harder than it seems! Having as many foods and liquids in your house as you can will help with those crucial decisions. Bear in mind you will be on a liquid diet so a blender is essential. Foods that helped me were milkshakes, soups, complan (essentially a fattening powder), protein powders, M&S mashed potatoes (…drool), yoghurts, blended stew, ice-cream and anything you can possibly think you could drink! When you get to week 3 and can start eating soft foods, Skips saved my life- they melt on your tongue and are the closest thing to crisps you’ll get for a while.

5. SHOWER

I cannot describe the feeling of showers after you get jaw surgery. For the first week or so, it was the only thing that made me feel better and 3 or more showers a day was the norm. Your face will swell up beyond belief in the weeks following the operation and even the most confident person would find it difficult to be in public. Showers will bring this swelling down (just make sure you don’t put your face under the water) and as well as that, they clear you head!

6. Make a list of things to do

Most people will get a good chunk of time off work or university for the surgery and while this may sound relaxing, it can be very boring! Make a list of TV shows (The OA being my current favourite obsession), books (Dolly Alderton: Everything I know about love!- you won’t put it down), podcasts, magazines, YouTube videos and even tasks you could do around the house. Arrange for your friends and family to come visit and make sure you’re never bored.

7. Take the dog on a walk

Or your cat, or your dad, or anyone really! Short walks will help bring down the swelling and it’s really easy to get stuck in a depressive rut during recovery. One thing though- never go by yourself! You won’t realise how weak you are and I only managed about 5 minutes every day from week 2-3.  

8. Get ready for the aftermath

Make sure you have baby toothbrushes and good dental mouthwashes. The last thing you want is a dental infection so make sure to keep it clean. When your swelling comes down and you start to see your new face, it will be strange, but if you keep your teeth nice and healthy during the recovery it will pay off when it comes to getting the braces off!

9. Make a food bucket list

This will be the fun part! Write down all your favourite foods and make an itinerary for the week before your operation. You will never crave food like you do on a liquid diet so force all your friends to join you for a Nando’s.

10. Breathe and relax

It will be sore. It will be mind-numbingly boring. It will feel like a lifetime. But when it’s all over you will be so happy you done it! Relax and enjoy your time off with some well-deserved pampering and hopefully someone looking after you! It’ll be over in no time 🙂

Lauren Wilson is a third-year BSc in Communication, Advertising & Marketing student at Ulster University, currently undertaking a year’s placement at Belfast City Council. She can be found at: LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurennxwilsonn/