7 Stages Of Realising You’re A Shopaholic

I would like to think that everyone has seen the classic movie, Confessions of a Shopaholic.

Here are my 7 Stages Of Realising You’re a Shopaholic.

1 – No I DON’T have too many shoes.

This is the most classic line of denial, for me anyway. I will continuously justify a new pair of shoes over any other item of clothing. No matter how similar it may be to another pair I will always need it. You will constantly be telling yourself that you need them, and whatever happens you will ALWAYS get them, no matter how long you wait to do it. You will wait until there’s a sale, either way, they will be yours at a stage.

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2 – One more won’t hurt.

You will always say that one more won’t hurt you.. but really, do you need it? Even though your wardrobe wont close, or your shoe cupboard is bursting open, there will always be a valid reason for buying more. KLARNA, you think its your best friend at the time until you have £150 worth of clothes and shoes in your basket that you know you will never send back. Believe me, it’s a risky business, maybe because someone decided to use mine for a bigger shopping spree than I usually do..

3 – If I pretend I had this for a while nobody will know.

Ah, this is a clear sign yo’re a shopaholic. Hiding the bags in your car until there’s nobody home and sneaking them in and ripping the labels off without anyone seeing them. Or even getting parcels delivered to another address so you wont have to listen to your parents hitting you with the ‘Another parcel came for you today’ or ‘would you ever stop ordering online’. It can’t just be my parents who are like that!!

4 – It’s a present TO me FROM me.

This is a  good way to justify buying things for yourself. Yes, everyone deserves a treat once and a while, but do they really deserve several treats in one week? (This is not a personal attack!!) I will always use ‘I’ve had a long day at work’ as an excuse to go ‘window shopping’ online **Spoiler – there is no such thing as window shopping online** This obviously results in me buying everything I like on every website I visit, and do I ever wear it all? No. But will I return it? Of course I won’t.

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5 – Starting to wonder where your moneys going to.

The dreaded moment. You check your bank account. There is barely anything left and its only half way through first semester. You start to wonder was your account hacked and checking your bank statements your starting to realise, no, that was all you. The worst of it is, all the clothes and shoes are for going out and you will always wear the same thing during the day.

6 – I really should have returned those clothes I will never wear.

Everyone has that one chair in their room. Yes, I am talking about THE CHAIR!! Whether its piled with clean clothes, clothes you wore for a wee while that isn’t clean but definitely isn’t dirty enough for the wash or else it is parcels upon parcels that you will never ever wear, but will never return. I’ve said it once and ill say it again..KLARNA is not your friend. All them orders where you thought you wouldn’t like anything, and you didn’t, but ‘forgot’ to return, they still come out of your bank account. I know, shock!

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7 – OK, I have too many shoes.

The Final Stage. You open the cupboard to put them new shoes in, the new coat, jeans or tops. It’s the end. There is literally no more room for anymore clothes in that wardrobe. You think to yourself, ‘I have far too much stuff, I should really clean out what I don’t wear.’ But, will you ever do that? Of course not. Do you keep buying more? Absolutely.

I’m sure many of you reading this can relate, but don’t worry. You are not alone.

 

Emma Murphy is a final year BSC in Communication Management and Public Relations student at Ulster University. She can be found at – Instagram: @emmamurf ; Facebook: Emma Murphy ; LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emma-murphy-bbb628196/ 

No Direction

‘Write about something you’re interested in’!

That statement along with the likes of , ‘tell the class something interesting about yourself’ (thanks Conor for covering that one)  or ‘what does that degree get you…you know what do you do with that?’, should come with trigger warnings.

So, just write a blog post about a passionate of yours, ok! Umm, (thinks , thinks, gets distracted ..thinks…) For God sake, why can’t you just give me a topic?

 

This might make me sound completely mental or hopefully, be slightly relatable to at least one other person. I, genuinely, don’t have a passion, an interest, a hobby or the faintest idea of what I want / should be doing. I’ve battled with this for ages but now, in final year, it seems like I’m really going to have to face it and deal with it head on. Not only do I have to think of something that I can withstand writing 10,000 words about for dissertation but after that, this escape from the ‘real world’ we call uni is over and it’s every woman/man for themselves.…

 

After a failed attempt to think of my passion, I literally Goggled (and not for the first time) ‘how to find your passion?’ Alas, ‘8 ways to find your passion’. Brilliant! There it is, when this load, I’ll have it. Ok …off to a good start, I suppose I’m not the only own to fill a little lost or unmotivated, but none of these articles, forums or blogs are providing me with what I need. It’s all about how to quit your job and fulfil your passion, but I’m looking for how to find it. Anyway, after reading and scrolling through comments – I couldn’t help but roll my eyes a little when ‘tash83xo’ told us that ‘waking up at 6am for a 45-minute run and an expresso/vanilla protein shake before the kids got up changed her life’. I needed more depth, more meaning and insight… Audible!

Dusting of that old app paused in the middle of ‘The Wisdom of Sundays: Life-Changing Insights from Super Soul Conversations’ by Oprah I began listening again and fell in love with it. Honestly, it’s such a great listen and I’d recommend to anyone, even if you’re not going through some sort of quarter life crisis, which is what I’m calling it at this point. Philosophers, phycologists, monks, ex-criminals take on different chapters and talk about everything from food, loneliness, road rage to life’s purpose.

Inspiration comes in waves when listening to it in the car driving to and from work, Oprah calls these ‘ah-ha’ moments. When something is said and it resonates, hits you in the gut or you get little butterflies and I think ‘I do that’, ‘I get that’.  I write notes on my phone, saving quotes which provide momentary relief or revelations.

One of them, probably the most relevant when it comes to uni or going out into the world of work, would be from Alan Watts “If you say that getting the money is the most important thing, you’ll spend your life completely wasting your time. You’ll be doing things you don’t like doing in order to go on living, that is to go on doing thing you don’t like doing, which is stupid.” Very Pinterest but Agreed! Ah-ha moment alert!

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I remember walking into placement on a Friday morning, Frappe Fridays to be specific, and me and the two other girls in the office began one of many Friday morning ‘deep chats’. What’s the point if everyone hates their job?’ ‘We literally live to work so shouldn’t we at least enjoy it’ ‘I think you should travel, and you’ll just figure it out’. After being so inspired on the way into work, I’m stuck again. Coffees finished, wisdom running out we contradicted everything we said and got back to the mundane tasks we didn’t care about until 5pm.

Now, I understand that nobody loves every aspect of their job and that not a single person has a perfect life where everyday is all sunshine and lollipops, but I also reject this idea that everyone completely hates their job and that’s just life because that’s bloody depressing. I want to have a job I’m passionate about. I refuse to be part of a ‘eat, sleep, work, live unconsciously, repeat’ society, at least, not forever . I want to at least be working towards a life that I feel my skills and attributes contribute to. To make a tiniest bit of difference to something would be quite cool.

So, I’m left still searching for what I love. For what I care enough about to dedicate a quite huge chunk of my life to. And, if it’s not going to come to me in an ‘That’s so Raven’ like vision, I’m going to need to figure it out and fast .. there’s another blog to write!

 

Megan Gillespie,  final year BSc in Communication Management & Public Relations at Ulster University. She can be found on: InstagramFacebookLinkedIn

5 Top Tips for Surviving Working at Christmas Party Nights

The countdown to Christmas has already begun with Belfast turning on its Christmas lights. For many this is an exiting whirlwind month but for those who work in hospitality dread the upcoming weeks. Having experience working in a hotel Bar at Christmas I’ve come up with my top 5 tips to surviving Christmas party nights that often have you working until 5am.

1. Have a clear plan of action

This means at the beginning of the shift making sure that there is a clear plan of action for the evening. Including having assigned positions for those members of staff on the floor and those staying behind the bar. By having assigned tables to equally spread out the floor staff also means that the customers are being served equally and therefore no table can be left behind and complain that they have waited ‘X’ amount of time for an order to be taken. It’s all about minimising the complaints. This also means if there is any outstanding bills at the end of the night on a table, the manager should know what employee was responsible for that customer. At Christmas time there is better tips for being on the floor that is why I’ll always volunteer to be floor staff, you can earn up to an average of £20 extra tips per night.

2. Make sure you know the menu

Whether this is what drinks you have in stock that evening or the dinner the customers are being served that evening, make sure you know the score. You’ll be amazed the amount of questions you will get asked by every customer including what they are even having for dinner, a question which I’m sure they’ve already been told a few times before. It is much easier when you are taking a drinks order if you are actually aware of what drinks you serve. By knowing the simple list of wines and beers on drafts for sale, this will save you running in and out of the room to double check. It means the customer is served quicker and your manager will not be angry having to answer simple questions when they already have so much in their plate that night. Customers will also not bother to see that there is a difference between those staff serving them food and those serving them drinks, therefore be prepared to be asked for things like extra butter and gravy, so make sure you communicate to the food staff about who’s asked for what.

3. Eyes up whenever you are in the room

This was probably the first piece of training I received in preparation for these Christmas party nights, and it remains one of the most crucial elements to a smooth running of events. When entering the room keep your eyes up, yes you may be carrying really heavy hot plates and you don’t want to spill the gravy on your thumb. Or you are carrying a tray with one too many drinks to save you the extra trip. But when there can be close to 500 people in a room that’s only supposed to seat almost 400, you have to be aware of your surroundings. Because if your eyes are fixed on what’s in your hands, this is how accidents happen and things are spilled on customers.

4. Anticipate what the Customers going to do

This tip also relates to the last one. When people are drunk they aren’t aware of their surroundings as much as the sober people who are serving. Customers will not care to look before pushing out their chairs to get up for something. If they are standing over someone else having a conversation with a friend they will also not look around to see if they are in anyone’s way. Therefore you almost have to guess what their next move will be. This means when carrying 2 heavy hot plates or a full tray of drinks, be careful of those customers who might bump into you then proceed to blame you for being in their way. I often find the same rule for driving applies here, just stop dead in your tracks and stand still therefore if anyone bumps into you it’s their fault not yours.

5. Stay ahead of the game

This is probably the most important tip if you want to finish work at a reasonable hour. Make sure you stay ahead of the game as much as possible. At a Christmas party night for 400 guests, they each have 2 wine glasses at their tables, so already you have 800 glasses given out and it hasn’t even started yet. If they each have a drink upon arrival, your total of glasses to clear is 1200 and the haven’t even ordered a drink of their choice yet. This means you have to constantly be clearing the room from the beginning of the night. The aim is to lift as many empty glasses during the dinner rather than at 1am after the party’s over. This is also where assigned tables are handy because the manager can actually tell which employee is behind. So your aim is to get as many closing procedures done as soon as possible so that the team is not there polishing wine glasses at 5am in the morning. The sooner new staff learn this the better for everyone else.

 

Niamh McMordie is a final year BSc in Communication Management & Public Relations student at Ulster University. She can be found at: Twitter – @niamh_mcm99 and Instagram – @niamhmcm_

1-0 to Winter

I’m that person who says “I can’t wait for the dark evenings and crisp winter mornings.” I’m usually bopping around in my boots and beanies, sipping on a hot chocolate, happy that it’s winter again. And I mean, Gavin and Stacey are having a Christmas Special this year after nearly a decade! This should be the best winter ever. But this year, I REGRET SAYING ANYTHING. CAN IT BE JULY AGAIN PLEASE? The winter rut of 2019 hit me hard & the fact I’m struggling through Final Year is not making it any easier.

I’m freezing, I’m tired, I’m uninspired and I’m unmotivated. I feel lazy, irritated (and probably irritating) and I’m not looking after myself, mentally or physically. I was thriving in Summer, living my best life, reaching my goals. But this winter? I’m feeling anything but.

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Enough was enough and a couple of weeks ago for the a thousandth time this year I said to myself, “Catherine, wise up”. I’m blessed with good health, in the final year of a degree I have dreamed of doing since I was 14, living with four of my best friends and fortunate to have many more around me. The last thing I should be doing is feeling sorry for myself because it’s cold and dark outside, I have assignment to do in a degree I signed up for and that the moon is making us all act a little funny. I decided to take it upon myself to find out why I might be feeling this way, and ways in which I can stop it.

Groundhog Day

A common reason we may start to feel stuck in a rut is when every day starts to feel the same. As a final year student with endless work to do, I felt the need to be in the library by 9am typing away, scanning journals and questioning whether this degree was really for me. Attending a lecture and seminar in the afternoon, before heading back to the library for another hour or two just to make myself feel “better”. When really, I was tired and my  heads so fried that I’m not making any progress at all and I had just spent 2 hours on a paragraph that most likely isn’t going to make the final draft of my assignment. Final year was draining me. I thought I was doing myself a favour, working super hard, getting ahead of the game, but I soon realised I was burning myself out and it was affecting me in more ways than one. I even got BANGS in week 5.

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I knew I had to let myself relax, take a chill pill or 5. Coincidentally the next morning Meibh and I had planned to go for a walk up Cavehill and go for a Brunch date afterwards. I know it sounds cliché when they say heading outdoors really clears the head. But seriously, my head hadn’t been as clear in weeks. After the best Avo Toast I’ve ever had, shoutout to Output Espresso, we were true to our white girl selves and went to Starbucks to do some work, where I completed and submitted my first assignment, without feeling stressed. Which is not surprisingly considering studies show that being outdoors lowers stress and enhances creativity. So, the next time you feel under pressure with work, don’t lock yourself in the library, go get some fresh air and relax for a few hours. You’ll be surprised with what work you’ll produce after.

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“Nobody’s Perfect.” (Hannah Montana, 2006).

When having a little snoop around this topic on Google I found an article that explains how Perfectionism can ironically make you feel stuck and effect your progress. Well… My name is Catherine and I’m a perfectionist. Something I thought I should be proud of. I even have it as one of my top qualities on my CV, oops. But after some reading I found out how being a perfectionist will have you going around in circles, never happy with whatever you have done. Completing an assignment will have you saying “could I have done this better?” a thousand times before hitting the submit button on turnitin, rather than giving yourself a pat on the back for completing an assignment which was really hard and challenging and something you should be proud of completing. Learn to squash perfectionism and recognise that something being done is better than being left undone. Focus on completing things, at a standard you’re proud of and show cases your abilities of-course, but move on afterwords and don’t beat yourself up on whether it’s perfect or not. After all, does perfection even exist?

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The little things matter

And then, there was just little things. I asked myself, was I looking after myself? Was I eating well? Was I sleeping enough? Spending time with people who made me feel good and doing things I enjoyed? And to be honest, I wasn’t really. So, I filled my wraps with salad for lunch and added a few pieces of broccoli to my meals at dinner time. I let myself sleep for 8 hours rather than set an alarm for 7.30am at 2am. When my friends at Uni asked me to go for coffee after I said, “I’d love to” rather than “I’m going to go to the library.” I arranged to see friends I hadn’t in a while, making plans I had to look forward to. I got back into some good habits I had let slip, remembered how important it was to get fresh air everyday and most importantly set some time aside just for ME!

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It’s pretty easy to get a little down in the dumps, but you’d be surprised at the little things that can make you feel a little better and help you ride through the storm. But most importantly, be easy on yourself, you’re doing the very best you can.

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Sometimes these feelings may be more than just being stuck in a rut. Such feelings may be signs of something more serious. If what you’re feeling is more than just being stuck in a rut, talk to a friend, a family member, your doctor or contact a mental health helpline right away.

Catherine Maguire is a Final Year year BSc in Communication, Advertising & Marketing student at Ulster University. She can be found on Instagram: catherinelauram and LinkedIn: Catherine Maguire

Why I chose to study Part-Time

When I decided to leave my degree after my first year at University in Liverpool due to student finance problems in 2015, I felt completely lost and undecided on what to do next. The only thing I was sure of was that I needed to move home. At the age of 22, the majority of my friends had either finished their degrees, still completing their degrees or in full-time work since our school days, which made me feel even more behind.

I still find it surreal that young people at the age of 16 are asked to choose a career they want to do for the rest of their lives. I am 26 years old now and if I am completely honest, I am still not completely sure. At 21, after much consideration, I felt I had to complete a degree to achieve successful career prospects. However, I was never the academic type, I was a more practical learner. For example, if I was shown how to do something, I would pick it up much faster and a downfall throughout most of my school life, if I wasn’t passionate about something, I would lose all interest. Therefore, I knew whatever option I chose to study I knew my degree had to be something I was particularly interested in or even good at.

After my time studying in Liverpool, I realised my skills lied in the promotion and the marketing aspects of many of my module tasks. It was then when I got back home I decided to look into courses around, PR and marketing at Universities in Belfast. I looked into Ulster University’s website and seen the course Communication Management and Public Relations. I decided to apply and go to their open day at The MAC theatre in Belfast and it was there I got to speak to the Course Director, Kerry-Ann. I emphasised my interests and that I wanted a course that would be flexible around my part-time job, that was when Kerry-Ann suggested part-time studying.

My perception of part-time was night classes, where the majority of the people would be older than me and I wouldn’t exactly get the university experience. However, Kerry-Ann reassured me that I would be in classes with the full-time students during the day, although it would be up to me what modules I decided to do and how long It would take me to complete my degree. Although for me there were still both pros and cons, one con in particular. A placement year wasn’t included in a part-time degree, for reasons I didn’t understand. A placement year was something I was always interested in as many friends of mine had the opportunity of a placement year and always mentioned that it was some of the best years of their lives, whether they stayed at home or moved abroad. However, the idea of part-time still sparked my interest and I decided to look into it further.

After some research, I was shocked to find out so much about part-time studying and confused as to why I had not looked into it before. What I found was as a part-time student you can be eligible for a means-tested fee grant and also a course grant. I also found out to study part-time was much more cost-effective and realised you can save a lot of money in comparison to full-time. Therefore, if you decide you want to complete your part-time degree in within 5 years, that is just one more year than a full-time degree with a placement year. The part-time total fee can be paid either in an up-front payment which means if you pay the full cost of your annual fees at enrolment you can receive a 5% discount. Or you can opt for a flexible payment, to help spread the cost of your studies, this means tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments if you wish.

Fast forward nearly 4 years, it is November and this semester I have started my final year modules that will cover the rest of this year and next. This will be a total time of 5 years spent at University when I finally graduate.

Looking back since I started my university journey part-time, it has been one of the best decisions I have ever made. Throughout my time studying I have been able to balance my degree around my home life, social life and best of all my work experience. Throughout the past few years, I have been lucky enough to secure part-time paid work experience in marketing and Public Relation agencies. Therefore, when I complete my studies in 2021 I will have a degree behind me as well has over 2+ years’ experience in Marketing and Public Relations, which I know a lot of employers look for. Not bad for an extra year of university, and fewer student fees at the end, I must say.

 

Kirby Axon is a part-time final year BSc in Communication Management and Public Relations student at Ulster University. She can be found at – Instagram: Kirby-Axon and LinkedIn: kirbyaxon

Fear and Loathing in Kingman, Arizona

For my first blog post for the Ulster PR Student blog I decided to write about a topic / experience I consider important and the impact that it had on myself as an individual. In the summer of 2018, I embarked on a road trip across the United States of America with my three best friends in a Dodge caravan.

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This motley crew consisted of a German American named Yanique Apgar, Jake Becker from Portsmouth, New Hampshire, two Irish men (including myself) and a lad from Carland, County Tyrone. One thing we shared in common? We had all met at a summer camp in Fryeburg, Maine in 2017.

The surreal and bizarre choice of wording for my title is deliberate and a direct reference to Hunter S. Thompson’s novel, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream.’ A basic synopsis of the novel revolves around journalist Raoul Duke and his attorney Dr. Gonzo as they travel to Las Vegas in 1971 in search of the ‘American Dream.’

From an early age I’ve found the concept of the American Dream and American culture fascinating. One of the many definitions available describe it as ‘the ideal by which equality of opportunity is available to any American, allowing the highest aspirations and goals to be achieved.’ Basically, meaning if you work hard enough you are entitled to the millions of dollars that you deserve.

When myself and my friends planned this road trip spanning from East coast to West coast, I was excited to see if the American consumerism and excess Hunter Thompson described in his novel still existed and if Las Vegas still symbolized the coarse ugliness of mainstream American culture. So, in a way, we were looking for the American Dream as well.

‘Buy the ticket, take the ride.’

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The first phase of our trip involved a 17-hour over-night drive from Boston, MA to Nashville, TN. The layout of the people carrier we were driving allowed for two passengers to sleep in the back (since the seats could be concealed in the body of the vehicle), whilst there was a driver and co-pilot in the front. The foggy descent along the East Coast travelling through New York, Connecticut, New Jersey and West Virginia into the South was an endurance test for all of us. My last recollection of the East coast was seeing the bright, high-standing structures of New York City, as I had decided to rest in the back and take the second shift of driving once, we arrived in Nashville.

We arrived in Nashville and had decided to enjoy one night on the town. We visited the main strip, a variety of vintage guitar shops and famous honky-tonk bars, a brief taste of what southern culture had to offer.

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Then came the bruiser…

My friend Jake had contacts in Golden, Colorado who we had decided to meet up with. Our trip was based on a 10-day window to arrive in San Diego, CA as I had to board a flight to NYC to meet my family. This meant I was riding shotgun for a 17-hour drive straight through the night through both Missouri and Kansas. This was a change from the opulence and wealth you’d experience on the East coast. Both Missouri and Kansas hold proud agricultural significance for the US, but what did this mean for us? 1,000 miles of driving through corn fields…

When we arrived in Colorado however, we were treated like kings. Jake’s friend’s family put us up in their mansion located in the Rocky Mountains.

After four days of wining and dining like celebrities in Denver, Boulder and Golden Colorado, it was time to travel the most significant leg of our trip, through the Utah desert.

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We had been experiencing problems with the axel of the caravan, this problem only escalated when approaching state lines leaving Utah and into Arizona. One of our back tires exploded on the desert highway leaving us stranded. After two hours with limited signal coverage a friendly passer-by stopped his pickup to offer assistance.

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The good Samaritan was a Native American who explained to us that his ‘son owned a reservation down the road,’ and that he would be more than happy to offer assistance. When we arrived on the reservation, we couldn’t help but notice how harsh the living conditions of the desert were for native American families living there. But also, a feeling for admiration for how resilient they must have been to continue life as normal in such a hostile environment.

Where was the reservation located? Around 50 miles outside the city limits of Las Vegas…

This made me reflect on the writings of Hunter Thompson and his critique of whether or not the American Dream was still alive and it’s relevance during our era.   Has the ‘get rich quick’ culture popularised today with social influencers, multi-media conglomerates and celebrity youth culture made us lose our moral compass?  Did me and my friends find the American Dream?

Francis Sherry is a final year BSc in Communication Management and Public Relations student at Ulster University. He can be found on Instagram: frankoosherry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did I give up on my dream of becoming an artist…or am I right where I need to be?

So here’s a little bit about me: My name is Kayleigh, I am 22 years old and I am only half way through my university degree. However before I can get to the good stuff I have to take you right back.

From a young age I always dreamt of being an artist. When I was in secondary school I lived and breathed art. Although I was very academic I only worked hard in other subjects (history & business) so that I could get the grades I needed to get into art school.

Long story short… my hard work paid off and my childhood dream came true. I was going to be an artist!

The calm before the storm 

In September 2016 I packed my bags and moved to the big city (Belfast). I was full of hopes and dreams; nothing was going to get in my way. Throughout my first semester my attitude changed. This course was not living up to my expectations, my dreams. I changed as a person. My parents noticed how unhappy and unenthusiastic I had become. This course was draining my passion for art from me day by day.

I have been told it takes real courage to change direction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Insight into Art School

One thing that you should know about studying art is that the meaning is more important than the execution. For example you could be amazing at art. You could draw the most perfect portrait, or paint the most beautiful painting the world has ever seen. But the question is… WHY did you draw that, what does it mean? 

It’s pretty…yes… but it doesn’t have a purpose or a story! (This is what they will tell you)

On the other hand someone could grab a ruler and draw a straight line. Perhaps they are feeling adventurous today and draw a square. But this is no ordinary square. Their square is the lines that define society.

My point is: It doesn’t matter how good the execution/final piece is, if there is no story or purpose to the art you will not get a good grade.

So is the creative idea more important than the execution if you want to become a successful artist?

*Come January 2017 I dropped out of my degree. I felt as though my world had ended but I couldn’t continue being this unhappy.

New Strategy

In September 2017 I started a new course: Communication, Advertising & Marketing at UU. To be honest I applied for this degree blindly. My dreams had been shattered. The future, unknown.

I was taught in school that marketing was a type of business degree that involved boring people in suits sitting in an office all day long reading reports etc. You would lead an extremely boring life…but hey you would be loaded!

How wrong was I? I was led down this path for a reason.

The re-invention of myself to date

I am now 4 months into my placement year at The Irish News. Every day I am faced with a new challenge or a new campaign. We create and pitch ideas. My ideas are actually listened to and taken on board. Once we establish that magic idea, we create a brief and send it to designers. We brief them on exactly what we would like the campaign to look like. From imagery, to colours to the overall design.

So am I the artist or is the designer who knows how to use photoshop?

I may not have created the final product…. BUT I was taught in art school that the final product is worthless if it doesn’t have a purpose/a story/a message.

It was drilled into me that I had a stupid dream because being an artist was like being a pop star, “you are never going to make it” “what will you do as a job”. There was a very slim chance that the world would see my art.

 

“Don’t give up on your dream because it is not going in the direction you want. There are different routes to the same destination. Stay focused and determined.”-  Janice Harris      

 

I took a different direction to achieving my dream. The dream I am now living.

I am no Picasso or Van Gogh but I guarantee that the majority of you reading this will have seen our artwork in the newspaper, online or perhaps on the side of a bus, you just don’t know it.

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Being a marketer means that my art is seen by the world, it has a purpose, it has a message and it has made a difference.

 

So… has my dream changed or developed? -That’s up for debate.

 

Kayleigh Tinney is a 3rd year BSc in Communication, Advertising & Marketing student at Ulster University, current doing a placement year at The Irish News. She can be found on: Instagram – @Kayleightinney and LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/kayleigh-tinney-76b240161/.