Placement Year: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Each year, a number of Ulster University students are given the opportunity to leave the comfort and safety of their cosy, convenience-filled university existence to go out into the big bad world of work as part of their studies to get the much-sought after experience they’ll need for life after education.

I’m currently in my final year of studying Communication Management and Public Relations and as part of my course I was offered the opportunity to be one of those students. I’ll be honest, when I first heard about it I thought ‘no way’, working life is not for me yet and I want to just power through with my studies and get final year done.

But, as the weeks went on I got more information, heard more success stories and invested some time researching the benefits. It became hard to justify not taking the opportunity. After all, research has shown that the average salaries of those who do placement is 8% higher than those who don’t. Money talks.  My classmates started applying for jobs, and the inevitable FOMO kicked in.

I’m not going to lie to you, the placement market is tough, it’s competitive, and after a few months of applications and interviews (some better than others) I had secured a placement in the third-sector with a really great charity.

I was delighted, scared, and eager to make a good impression.

Now, it’s time to get to the good stuff. Going on placement is a big undertaking, one that requires thought and research so let me impart some of my insights on the good, the bad, and the ugly life of a placement student.

The Good…

  • Get ready for your CV to shine- As I head into final year I am now starting to think, what next? I am starting to think about my future career and where I want to go when it’s all over. Thankfully, my CV is now bursting with lots of different examples of my skills and experience that I have acquired through my placement. Doing a placement will allow you to put your foot in the door and help you stand out to an employer when applying for jobs in the future.

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  • Networking- Fortunately, throughout my time in placement I was to be able to meet and chat with lots of different people within the industry. Doing a placement will allow you to make necessary contacts that may be useful to you in the future. It’s a big world out there and getting yourself known is essential to any job in PR/Communications.

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  • Experience- Probably the best reason to choose to do a placement year. It’s an experience. It will allow you to see first-hand what it’s like to work in your chosen field. For me, before doing my placement I had no clue what I wanted to do in terms of my career, I felt like I was just floating by hoping someday a light bulb would go off and I would know what I want to do. My placement year was an eye opener, it allowed me to see what I’m good at, what I need to improve on and most importantly where I would like to go career wise.

The Bad…

  • Trying to find a placement- This was a toughie for me. Once I made the decision to do a placement year I then had to go and get it myself. The university is a great help in terms of advertising jobs and providing interview tips but ultimately, it’s all down to you in the interview.

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The Ugly…

  • Adapting to the change- Doing a placement year allows you to get out into the big bad world and have a serious role in a field you are interested in. At first, this can be overwhelming and a big change compared to university life. You may have to miss out on a few Wednesday night drinking sessions due to having work at 9am or you might end up in this situation…

Did you go out last night

  • Your financial situation- You might be one of the lucky ones that gets a placement that pays fairly well. However, more and more placements are now unpaid or will only pay travel costs. It may be unfeasible for you to afford to leave your current job or you might have to take on a job elsewhere which can be stressful. At the start of my placement I was working six days a week, two jobs isn’t easy!

Ultimately, deciding to do a placement in third year is completely up to you.

Personally, I wouldn’t look back. I think I made the best decision and I loved getting the experience of working full-time. I now feel well prepared to apply for graduate jobs with a lot of experience behind me.

However, it may not be for you and that’s completely fine too. Speak to your lecturers, career’s advisers and even your friends to help you decide.

Don’t stress just do what’s best for you!

(Orlaith Strong is a final year BSc in Communication Management and Public Relations student at Ulster University. She can be found on Twitter: @orlaith_strong and Linkedin: @orlaithstrong)

The “P word”

“Placement”.

The nine letter word that instils instant fear and dread in university students.

The “if we don’t talk about it, it doesn’t exist” topic.

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It’s scary isn’t it? One minute you’re catching up with friends, preparing for fresher’s week and celebrating the return of the student loan; the next you’re being forced to ~god forbid~ start thinking about your future and what you actually want to do with your life.

You’ll start having placement students, members of companies and placement co-ordinators making appearances in lectures, and start receiving emails in your university email account that you only ever really use to activate your UniDays discount.

Well, don’t worry – here are some do’s and don’ts to help prepare you for one of the scariest things about second year (second to the fact that this year actually counts towards your degree classification).

Take it from a current placement student who has learned some of these the hard way. And no, I did not follow all of these, which is precisely why I am advising you to.

 

DO:

Start early.

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Give yourself a head start and the best chance you can. The last thing you need when you have assignments to write and exams to revise for is to worry about actually starting to write a CV and figure out what a cover letter even is.

 

DON’T:

Feel as though you have to go on a traditional placement. You have options, consider them. Yes, you can go on placement, but you can also take part in programmes such as Study USA or Intern China, or go straight into final year. Everyone is different and wants different things. It’s your degree, your choice and a year of your life at the end of the day. Placement isn’t for everyone, and you know what? That’s totally fine.

 

DO:

Proof read.

Stop rolling your eyes. Yes it’s one of those “duh” points, but it has to be said. After writing around 20 cover letters and application forms, you might discover a shortcut of “I’ll just write the same thing and change the company name and job title”; well, that’s all well and good until you submit a cover letter stating how much you would love to be a marketing intern at one of the leading car retailers to a milk company looking for a web developer.

Which leads to my second point.

 

DON’T:

Make every application/cover letter the same.

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Companies can see right through you and know exactly when you’re using generic applications. Every application should be tailored to suit the company and job you’re applying for. State why to want to work there, and why you would be ~perfect~ for that role. The more specific and relevant your application is, the more likely the reader is to consider you.

Take it from someone who did the whole “copy and paste” approach, and got rejections for not being ‘enthusiastic’ or ‘passionate’ enough about the job or business.

 

DO:

What’s best for you. Friends are such a big part of our lives, and it’s nearly impossible not to be influenced by them; but don’t feel pressured to do something just because they are. Don’t apply for a job you don’t want just because “all of my friends have”, don’t choose jobs based in a certain country because you want to be near them, don’t decide not to do a placement even though you want to just because your best friend hasn’t and you want to “graduate together”.

I mean, “if your friends jumped off a cliff” and all that.

 

DON’T:

Be afraid to be different. Oh, you think writing 30 cover letters, applications and CVs is boring? Try reading 100s of them. Make the employer interested. This is your chance to show your potential and why you deserve the job. Yes, of course that’s what the interview is for- but what if you don’t get that far? Give the employer no choice but to want to meet and learn more about you and what you can bring to the company.

 

DO:

Practise.

Do you know what a psychometric test is? Yeah, one of those “what shape’s next and mathsy sort of test things”. Well, whenever you’re about to complete one, you might get a ‘guide’ which includes what sort of questions will be asked, how much time you have and practise questions. READ IT. I was one of those “I’d rather get it over and done with” so skipped the guide and practise questions. Well, joke was on me when, approximately 12 minutes later I was sitting at the computer trying not to cry and swearing I would boycott a certain brand for life because of the emotional trauma they had caused me. I mean, who cares how many yen 500 US dollars is worth? Well, for some unknown reason, that company does.

 

DON’T:

Panic apply.

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If you haven’t got a placement sorted yet but some or all of your friends have, it can be tempting to start applying for every single placement opportunity you get told about. It’s important that you only apply to jobs you actually want. Would you rather wait a few weeks or months and get your ideal job, or be the first one to get a placement but end up not even liking the sound of it?  It can be frustrating getting nothing but rejections or ignored for months, but it’s worth waiting for that one real “YES” moment.  I found myself relieved to get some rejections because I didn’t even really want a job or what it was, but I mightn’t have been as lucky and ended up having to take one and spend a year doing something I hated and wasn’t suited for.

 

And now for my final gem of advice:

 

DO:

Enjoy second year.

There’s nothing you appreciate more than 9 hour weeks and being able to go for LUNCH DATES than working 8 hours a day and having to pack lunches like you’re back in school. Second year was such an amazing year for me, and yes, it’s hard work and a step up from first year; but it’s still a great time to socialise, learn, think about what you actually want, and go out on a weeknight?? Imagine.

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Well there you go folks, that’s a wrap. Hopefully you learned something reading this, and if you didn’t – US $500 will get you around 56,698 Japanese yen. Ha – now you have learned something *pats self on back*.

 

Niamh Murray is a 3rd year BSc in Communication, Advertising & Marketing student at Ulster University, currently on a placement year at The Irish News. She can be found on Instagram: @_neeev, Facebook: Niamh Ni Mhuirí and LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/niamh-murray-4a013a150/

Writing a CV to sell yourself

When it comes to searching for a job the excitement can quickly subside when you consider the state that your severely neglected CV is in. Yes, the application process for some companies can be very extensive and seem unnecessary but you need to get on with it because there will always be someone out there who is willing to put in the effort that you are lacking. I am here to help, by putting together some useful hints and tips, however major disclaimer: I am in no way an expert in this field and therefore not guaranteeing a 100% success rate but have a read and hopefully you will pick up something useful.

General tips

You need to put yourself in the mind of the company who will be reading your application. If you were a recruiter what would you want to know about yourself? What would matter the most? What qualities would you be looking for?

Most of you will be applying for a job/placement in Marketing, Communications, Public Relations, Advertising or any hybrid of the above. You need to understand that communication will be a critical part of your role and therefore if you can’t write a CV and cover letter without a grammar mistake then in the words of DJ Khalid:

However, I do understand that your brain can work against you when rereading by running on autopilot, overlooking missed words and grammar mistakes. There are a few steps you can take to weed out the mistakes:

1. Printing it off- This may seem so old school but you are more likely to spot some mistakes with pen and paper.

2. Giving it to someone to read over- a fresh set of eyes can sometimes spot the mistakes you missed.

3. Using an online spell checker- I do recommend Grammarly and SpellCheckPlus although these websites may only pick up spelling mistakes instead of poor grammar so do be careful not to rely on them too much.

CV

It’s common knowledge that a recruiter will take less than 15 seconds to look at your CV, in other words, you have 15 seconds to let the employer know that you are exactly what they’re looking for and more!

Design

Use design to create a simple, clean, and clear CV. If your design doesn’t add to the simplicity of the document then you’ve missed the mark here.

Length

The more concise the CV, the more of it that will get read within the 15-second time frame so get rid of any waffle and stick to punchy bullet points. I suggest trying to fit it on one page if possible.

Relevancy

Keep it current so that means the volunteering you did 6 years ago at your local animal rescue shelter, although very commendable, is not necessary to include.

Adapt

Every company is different and is looking for different things so you can’t afford to be lazy. The more that you can tailor your CV to the company, the more ticks in boxes you get from the employer.

On a final note, do be careful when you are exporting your CV to a PDF as this has a tendency to disrupt the layout and structuring of the document. Make sure to open the exported version to check for any changes before you send it off.

Cover letter 

When there is an option to include a cover letter, ALWAYS INCLUDE A COVER LETTER! Use this as an opportunity to fill in the blank spaces between you and the role your applying for. You need to show the recruiter how everything that you’ve said on your CV will actually be of benefit to them and the position they are trying to fill. You can’t expect them to put 2 and 2 together, you must do this for them.

Do your research! This seems so cliche and is usually the most tedious part but trust me, it can really set you apart. Don’t just stop at the ‘About us’ page on their website, take a look at any recent news articles mentioning the company and their successes.

Do avoid waffling and restrain yourself from using sweeping yet hollow phrases stating that you are ‘a very determined individual’ without telling them how. You need to back up every statement that you make with a relevant example to prove this. Remember, actions speak louder than words.

Before you start your cover letter, grab a notebook and make 2 lists;

In the first list make a note of the skills required for the position. For example, these will include ‘excellent written communicative skills’. The second will outline the individual qualities that the company is looking for in you. These 2 lists create a checklist to make sure that you’re addressed and answered their requirements. It’s not important to address every single requirement but obviously the more the better.

Finally and most importantly, sell yourself! I don’t doubt that you are extremely talented and have done some impressive things so don’t be afraid to tell them.

The only thing left to do now is to send it…

Megan Rea is a final year BSc in Communication, Advertising and Marketing student at Ulster University. She can be found on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/megan-rea-a52437111/

How Placement Prepped me for Final Year

Last year I spent 12 months working at Randox Laboratories, Crumlin. I never gave much thought into why I was applying for placement in 2nd year; I just thought of it as something we had to do and understood that it would be beneficial when it came to seeking graduate jobs, as I’d have some experience to show for. But its only when I began the daunting journey of final year, that I realised just how much placement year has benefited me.

These are 5 practical things placement year has taught me:

 

1. Keep a diary

Before placement, the only diary I had ever faithfully kept was my ‘Little Mermaid’ one aged 8 – to write about my favourite/least favourite family member that day, who I fancied, or how I got on at my Irish dancing competition that weekend. When I got my first proper A4 business diary when I started in Randox, I wondered how I could ever really need or fill it. But as time passed, the diary became as important as the computer I did my work on. Filled with to-do lists, payday dates, meeting times, and reminders; I used it every day and would have been lost without it.

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Now, I still keep a diary – although it’s a personal one with much less content, it’s just as important and keeps me right in terms of classes, meetings, appointments; you name it. Being organised is important in final year and this is one way to ensure you are!

 

2. Check your emails

Before placement, emails definitely were not my thing; with both my university and personal unread inboxes exceeding the hundreds. If someone needed me they could just Whatsapp or Facebook me – right? Wrong. It took me about 2 days of placement to realise that email is everything in the office. (Especially if you’re in Crumlin where there is no signal and it’s the only form of contact… Even lunchtime had to be arranged via email.) Everything is arranged by email, and failure to check emails in work could have resulted in missing a meeting that had been pushed forward or missing a last-minute task that needed to be completed urgently.

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The same applies to Uni now; forgetting to check university emails can mean missing events, job meetings or just general updates (#OpheliaClosure), so I try to stay on top of them.

 

3. Coffee is your friend

Starting work at 8:40 each day and finishing at 5.20 took some time getting used to for a second year used to having class 3 times a week for a few hours. Coffee definitely helped with this, and I rarely sat at my desk without an americano at my side. This habit, whilst not the healthiest, has stayed with me and I rarely go a morning without. It definitely helps for those late-night library sessions!

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4. Time is precious

Working full time makes you realise how precious time is – a simple doctor or dentist appointment requires planning and notice. Gone were the days where I could stroll into town at my leisure for a mid-week appointment and have a browse in the shops after! I think the reduction in time you have to yourself whilst working 9 to 5 in the ‘real world’ for a year ultimately helps you organise your time better in final year. Your weekend only part-time job in final year becomes a breeze in comparison and still leaves you with adamant time to socialise study.

 

5. Wake up early

Getting up before 7 every morning was not my most favoured part of placement, not going to lie… But it got me into a good routine, and even on days off I found myself waking up early because it’s what I was used to. This is in stark contrast to second year Emma, whose idea of early was 11AM… I find that waking up early puts you in a better mood for the day as you haven’t wasted any of it. Lie ins are great at times, but on the most part it’s beneficial to get up earlier as it allows you to get more done in your day – something which is particularly relevant in final year when deadline’s may seem to pile on top of each other.

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So that’s it, 5 simple ways placement has helped me transition from second year to final year. Undoubtedly, I learnt a lot more in relation to my course which has helped me throughout my modules so far, but these are some lifestyle habits I gained along the way.

 

Emma McVeigh is a final year BSc in Communication, Advertising and Marketing student at Ulster University. You can contact her on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/emma-mcveigh-611462a4/ or on Twitter @emmamcveigh_

 

 

Creating a Dementia Friendly Community

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There are currently around 850, 000 people living with Dementia in the UK. Dementia knows no boundaries, no age limits, no race, and no gender.  The youngest person to ever be diagnosed with Dementia in the UK was 6… Yes!  6 years old!

Whilst on my placement with Radius Housing, at the request of John McLean, Radius’ CEO, I teamed up with Care Services Manager Deirdre Carr, to take the lead on making Holywood a Dementia Friendly Community.  It was an absolute pleasure to be asked to work on this project as it is something I am particularly passionate about and it a subject very close to my heart.

Deirdre Carr, Care Services Manager, and I worked alongside Dementia NI and the Alzheimer’s Society to create a timeline plan; our first step was to get all the businesses in Holywood involved and on board – who wouldn’t jump at the chance to be on board with such a worthy local project? After hand delivering 86 letters inviting the businesses to a short information session only 3 businesses turned up!  BUT we didn’t let that deter us, we picked ourselves up, dust ourselves down and continued to work hard.

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We were kindly welcomed to the Dementia NI empowerment group where we met with people living with Dementia.  This was vital to kick start our Dementia Friendly Community as we were getting invaluable advice about what people living with Dementia wanted to see in their community.

The first suggestion was two different types of coffee mornings – one was a memory café and the other a careers support coffee morning.  We liaised with the local library and they were very accommodating allowing us to hold the memory Café once a month in their meeting room.   The Yard invited us to use their upstairs area for the careers support coffee morning.  The feedback we received from both coffee mornings was over-whelming, so much so there is now 2 memory cafes a month – still receiving great support!  The second suggestion was a monthly newsletter. Each month we published a newsletter to create awareness; every month the newsletter had a calendar of events, a map of Holywood showing where each event was and information about Dementia.  We also created a social media account and got posters printed to create awareness and tackle the stigma attached to Dementia.

Deirdre and I then went on to complete our Dementia Champion training – this course allows us to train others to become Dementia Friends and be more understanding of those living with Dementia. We started by training staff in-house the first of which was the tele-care staff and then moved into the wider community where we trained businesses within Holywood, the career support group and primary school pupils.  At present we are working to train all of the Ards and North Down Borough Council.

Dementia Awareness week

Having raised awareness and getting ‘Dementia Friendly Holywood’ up and running we decided it was time for an Official Launch.  As if organising an official Launch wasn’t enough work, we decided to run an event every single day that week, and what better week then Dementia Awareness Week  – we held Afternoon Tea, a Memory Walk and a Quiz to name but a few.  The launch event was well support and many local businesses hosted a stall, we had the local councilor attend and the Mayor also came to preside the official launch.

 

 

 

Given the amount of time and effort put in by everyone we were absolutely delighted to learn that we had been nominated for 4 different awards with the Alzheimer’s Society in November this year.

  1. Dementia Community of the Year (Dementia Friendly Holywood, runner up)
  2. Dementia Partnership of the Year (Dementia Friendly Holywood, winner)
  3. Dementia Champion of the Year (Jenny Martin, runner up)
  4. Dementia Young Person of the Year (Jenny Martin, Winner)

Having now completed my placement year with Radius Housing I still continue to help out with activities for Dementia Friendly Holywood and assist with the creation of Dementia Friendly Peninsula and Dementia Friendly Carrick.

Dementia Friendly Holywood Facebook

Dementia Friendly Holywood Twitter 

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Jenny Martin is a final year BSc student in Communication, Advertising and Marketing at Ulster University, Jordanstown. You can follow her on Twitter @Jennymartin95 or on Facebook: /jenny.martin.12979431

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Placement year. Nothing to be Concerned about!

The Charity sector. Somewhere I didn’t think a degree in Public Relations could take you. My views were drastically changed through my placement year at Concern Worldwide where I saw the range of activities that a PR professional can engage in.

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The Community Fundraising team at Concern

Going into my interview (which was a day before I was heading off on a 6 week holiday to Vietnam and Thailand) I wasn’t convinced that this was going to be the job for me. Debating with my parents whether I should actually even go to the interview at all, I (my mum) decided I should go for interview experience. 2 days later, as I was sitting in a bar in Bangkok, I got a phone call from Concern asking me to take the job. Not a bad start to the holiday!

A day after I came back from holidays I took up my new job role. Understandably I was still abit jet-lagged after a 13 hour flight the day before and so was slightly hesitant about the workload, but think everyone realised I wasn’t going to be much use for a couple of days!

Concern was broken up into several different departments. I was based in the Community Fundraising team where we dealt with day-to-day fundraisers or events, Concern groups and worked closely with schools, amongst many other things. After finding out about my experience in the retail sector through working for Next for several years, I was also put in charge of managing one of Concern’s retail shops for a couple of months, which developed a lot of my skills massively.

Since I left school 4 years ago, my interests have always been in events and events management. I was over the moon when my manager told me I would be taking control of the London Marathon for the year. This was a major responsibility for me in the Community Fundraising team.

The London Marathon is one of the main sources of income for the year for the team as each individual needs to raise at least £2000. Concern buys several places every year and to fill them takes a lot of work (as I well and truly found out) due to the nature of different charities competing to fill all their spaces. I took advantage of piggybacking on Concern’s ‘Do Your Thing’ Campaign which was aimed at people going out and doing challenges and donating any money raised to Concern.

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Some of the team at the cheering point for our runners in London

After several months of slaving away trying to get the numbers of registrations up we finally reached the target of 12 individuals which was absolutely fantastic. It was vastly rewarding when looking through all of our participants and seeing the range of people who had signed up. Ranging from a school teacher who has completed over 25 marathons, to a successful security firm consultant from Dubai. As I had to keep on top of people’s sponsorships, I was in contact with everyone at least twice a week, and it was rewarding to build relationships with people from such a range of backgrounds. Soaking up all the atmosphere around London really enjoyable and to see our runners come over the line one by one was extremely rewarding. To make things better we raised over £32,000 (and still rising when I was leaving) which was the most the event had raised for Concern in several years.

Other events I was involved in was the Christmas Jumper World Record Attempt in Derry last Christmas. Concern were one of the benefitting charities and myself and a couple of my colleagues helped organise the event on the day. We dropped short, but it was close and was a good insight into event management! A not so happy one was my involvement in the One World Run committee. Again, with Concern being one of the benefiting charities, they required a representative on the board, which I elected to do. Unfortunately, the founding members felt that after a series of unprecedented circumstances, the event would have to come to a close. I was involved with the organisation of the closing ceremony which took place in the Lord Mayor’s Parlour at City Hall with Brian Kingston attending and speaking at the event, which was a pleasure to be a part of.

All in all, my placement opened my eyes to the flexibility of the charity sector in relation to Public Relations and Marketing. Everyone in the company made it an extremely enjoyable year, especially my own team who helped me through my events and campaigns. Was definitely worth the last minute interview!

Daniel McGrenaghan is a final year BSc in Public Relations student at the University of Ulster. He can be found on Twitter @danielmcg132

My pursuit of placement

I began looking for somewhere to do my placement year quite late in the year …… actually really late (I don’t recommend this). But for me this was actually a blessing in disguise.

I’m not the most organised person in the world and I’ve always been very laid back and easy going and whilst looking for a placement back in second year I was no different because I left everything as I always do to the very last minute.

 

While everyone was busy preparing and panicking for their numerous interviews I still hadn’t even brought myself to start my CV. Although I was very keen on doing a placement and I just sort of figured, if it happens its happens and if doesn’t it’s not the end of the world. By March and April many of my class mates were running around like headless chickens in search of placement worrying that all the good ones had gone. What did I do? I took it easy like I always do and concentrated on my upcoming assignment deadlines.

 

It wasn’t until I finished my final test in mid-May when I finally put pen to paper and finished my CV and by this stage everyone I knew was sorted with placement. Did this worry me? I’m not going to lie maybe a little. But I just thought to myself it will be less competition to deal with when I go to my interviews. I had two holidays to enjoy one in Spain and the other in Dublin before I could even consider actually applying for any placement opportunities.

 

Once I had my two holidays over I put my head down and started looking, I heard back from two companies and was asked to come in for an interview. It’s safe to say I don’t think they could have gone worse for both interviews I was in and out in less than 10 minutes I should have just kept the car running to be honest.

 

So, another few months rolled by and at this point it was it was late august and the summer was almost over and being the laid back and easy-going person I am I still had not got my placement sorted. I hadn’t yet reapplied for my student loan and if I had, I would have probably given up only of course I hadn’t, because it’s an absolute nightmare to fill out and without fail I always seem to make a mistake somewhere. I was ready to admit defeat give up when I came across Mencap’s job advertisement. Having volunteered with the special Olympics Ireland for two years, a charity similar to Mencap I decided to give it go and apply. To my absolute surprise and just in the nick of time two weeks before I was due to start my final year at Ulster I got offered the placement at Mencap.

 

I’ve volunteered for charities before but I had never really considered working for one. I was so over to moon to have an organisation that wanted to take me on and help me develop and enhance my skill I didn’t think twice.

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Mencap are a learning disability charity that support thousands of people with a learning disability to live their lives the way they choose. They work in partnership with people with a learning disability in Northern Ireland to fight to change laws and improve services and access to education, employment and leisure facilities.

 

I had many rewarding and roles within the charity one of which was to assist in gathering and developing content for Mencap NI social media. I was also in of charge of researching and writing up the Mencap NI weekly bulletin. Another role was to assist in developing content for the Mencap NI webpages. This was a job I done on a daily basis and it involved me updating and editing blogs, news stories or publishing press releases.

 

I really learnt a lot from my manager during my time at Mencap and it was great to part of their team. It was amazing to see first-hand the great work they do and the difference they make to people in local communities.  I had a great year at Mencap loving every single second, I met lots of amazing people (including Rory McIlroy).

 

Niamh McNally is a final year BSc in Public Relations student at Ulster University. She can be found on Twitter at @Niamh_McNally or LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/niamh-mcnally-7a7079120/